Unfinished business : Black women, the Black church, and the struggle to thrive in America (Book, 2012) [Nashville Public Library]
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Unfinished business : Black women, the Black church, and the struggle to thrive in America

Unfinished business : Black women, the Black church, and the struggle to thrive in America

Author: Keri Day
Publisher: Maryknoll, N.Y. : Orbis Books, ©2012.
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
This portrayal of the poverty of black women in this country describes the unemployment, underemployment, isolation, and lack of assets they typically experience. The author also takes on and demolishes the common stereotypes that castigate poor black women as "morally problematic and dependent on the money of good tax-paying citizens." She then calls on the black churches to become potential agents of change and  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Keri Day
ISBN: 9781570759819 1570759812 9781608332151 1608332152
OCLC Number: 788299125
Description: x, 180 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Black women's poverty revisited --
Is the Black church "home" for poor Black women? --
Saving poor Black women : faith-based initiatives --
We too are America --
Guilty until proven innocent --
The unfinished business of the Poor People's Campaign : a new gender and sexual politics --
A new kind of prosperity gospel --
An asset-building policy approach --
Building a movement to end poverty.
Responsibility: Keri Day.

Abstract:

This portrayal of the poverty of black women in this country describes the unemployment, underemployment, isolation, and lack of assets they typically experience. The author also takes on and demolishes the common stereotypes that castigate poor black women as "morally problematic and dependent on the money of good tax-paying citizens." She then calls on the black churches to become potential agents of change and leaders in addressing the unequal social and economic structures that hold captive these poor women. The goal is to empower poor black women to develop assets that will prevent long-term poverty and allow them to flourish.
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